All things Pembrokeshire

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Abercastle

Abercastle or Abercastell in Welsh, is in the north of the county. Abercastle has a working harbor and was the landing site of the first single handed Atlantic sailing from west to east in 1876 from Gloucester, Massachusetts by the Danish fisherman Alfred Johnson. There is a plaque made of welsh slate on the quay wall near the slipway.

About half a mile west of Abercastle is Carreg Sampson and the Longhouse. The Longhouse is a Neolithic burial chamber of over 1000 burials. The cap stone is 15 foot long and 9 feet wide supported on 3 of the 7 upright stones. It has Samson’s name as local legend says that Samson placed it in position with his little finger

Abereiddy

Abereiddy is the site of the ruins of the Blue Lagoon, a small slate quarry. In September 2012, 14 of the world’s best divers dived from a manmade platform 27 metres above the Blue Lagoon. There is going to be another event in 2013, tickets will be on sale to go and see this world famous event

Amroth

Amroth, meaning ‘on the brook called Rhath’ in Welsh, is in the south of Pembrokeshire. It is about 5 miles east of Tenby along the coast. Amroth was once an important anthracite coal mining area, until the end of the 19th century. Ruins of the castle at Amroth still remain and it is part of the national ‘Cistercian Way’

Amroth is also the start of the Pembrokeshire national park.

Angle

"ANGLE; or NANGLE, a parish, in the hundred of CASTLEMARTIN, union and county of PEMBROKE, SOUTH WALES, 10 miles (W.) from Pembroke; containing 388 inhabitants. This place is situated at the south- western extremity of the county, and in an angle of Milford haven, affording excellent anchorage for small vessels. . . it comprises by computation about 2100 acres, of which 934 are arable, 788 pasture, 160 sandy burrows, 20 wood, and 195 cliff, waste, &c. . . The surface in some parts is hilly, and the scenery, both local and distant, picturesque and interesting, the eminences commanding beautiful and extensive views, embracing Milford haven, Bristol channel, &c. . . There is a good village, in which the chief part of the population resides. The female inhabitants are employed in plaiting straw for bonnets, hassocks, and matting; and, during the season, the men are occupied in dredging for oysters. . . The church, which is dedicated to St Mary . . . There is a day school, commenced in 1821, in which are about 50 children, the expense of whose instruction is defrayed by the parents; also a National Sunday school, begun in 1827, in which are 60 children, taught gratuitously by the master of the day school. . . " [From A Topographical Dictionary of Wales (S. Lewis, 1844).]
http://www.genuki.org.uk/big/wal/PEM/Angle/

Barafundle

Barafundle Bay can be reached from Stackpole Quay by walking over the coastal path. There is no direct road access to the Bay but you can park in the National Trust carpark at Stackpole Quay. Barafundle Beach has been voted one of the best beaches in the world.

Begelly

Begelly is a small village about 6 miles north of Tenby on the road to Narberth and Haverfordwest. Begelly joins Thomas Chapel to make up the parish of Begelly. The parish was known for 19th century anthracite mining.

Bletherston

Bletherston is a small hamlet between Narberth and Haverfordwest. The english name seems to have come from the welsh name of Bleddri, a name and Trefelen meaning 'yellow farm'.

Boncath

Boncath lies in Pembrokeshire just before the Cardiganshire border. The village was host to the 2013 Urdd Eisteddfod.

Bosherston

Boulston

Brawdy

Bridell

Broad Haven

Burton

Camrose

Carew

Castlemartin

Cheriton

Cilgerran

Cilgwm

Clarbeston

Clydey

Clynderwen

Cosheston

Croes-Goch

Crymmych

Dale

Deep Lake

Dinas

East Williamston

Eglwyswrw

Fishguard

Flimston

Freshwater East

Freshwater West

Freystrop

Goodwick

Granston

Gumfreston

Haroldston West

Haverfordwest - County Town

Haverfordwest is the county town of Pembrokeshire and has a population of 13,367 (2001). The town itself is fairly small and as with other towns, large shops have moved into the suburbs to draw away people from the town.

Historical facts of the town have been summarised by David Llewellyn of the Pembrokeshire Record Office. The facts come in 2 parts and can be found at the following links: Part 1 and Part 2

Hayscastle

Henrys Moat

Herbrandston

Hermon

Hodgeston

Hook

Hubberston

Jeffreyston

Johnston

Jordanston

Kilgetty

Lampeter Velfrey

Lamphey

Landshipping

Lawrenny

Letterston

Little Newcastle

Llandeloy

Llandissilio

Llandygwydd

Llanfyrnach

Llangwm

Llanhowel

Llanllawer

Llanreithan

Llanrian

Llanstadwell

Llanstinan

Llantood

Llanwnda

Llanycefn

Llanychaer

Llawhaden

Llechryd

Ludchurch

Lydstep

Maenclochog

Manorbier

Manordeifi

Manorowen

Marloes

Mathry

Middle Hill

Milford Haven

Minwear

Monington

Morvil

Moylgrove

Mynachlogddu

Narberth

Nevern

Nevern is a beautiful village in the north of Pembrokeshire. There is an 18th century mounting block outside the church yard used for mounting and dismounting horses. In the churchyard you can see the Bleeding Yew tree and the Pilgrims Cross which was a stopping point en route to St Davids. Never was once a place of pilgrimage and prayer. On climbing up behind the church, you can see the image of a cross raised from the rock and sunken footsteps from early pilgrims as they made the way west.

Also up the hill are the remains of the 12th century castle. It was seized by Norman lord Robert Fitzmartin in the early 12th century then changed hands several times before being destroyed.
Welcome to Nevern sign, Nevern

Nevern

New Hedges

New Moat

Newchapel

Newgale

Neyland

Nolton

Pelcomb

Pembroke

Pembroke Dock

Penally

Pen-ffordd

Pen-y-cwm

Penrydd

Pontfaen

Porthgain

Puncheston

Redberth

Reynalton

Rhos-hill

Rhoscrowther

Robeston Wathen

Roch

Rosebush

Rosemarket

Rudbaxton

Saundersfoot

Solva

Spittal

St Brides

St Davids - Cathedral City

St Davids is the smallest city in the UK with a population of 1797 (2001). St Davids boasts Wales largest cathedral which attracts thousands of visitors every year.

St Dogaels Llandudoch

St Dogwells

St Florence

St Ishmael's

St Lawrence

St Nicholas

St Twynnells

Stackpole

Stepaside

Talbenny

Tavernspite

Templeton

Tenby - Premiere Holiday Resort

Tenby is Pembrokeshire's main holiday resort. The local population is approximately 6,000. During the summer months, the town, with a variety of accommodation, raises the population to tens of thousands. Tenby has 2 main beautiful beaches, the North and South. Within these beaches are smaller coves including the Harbour beach, the Castle beach and the Paragon. Tenby is full of historical importance which can be seen from the walls and turrets that surround the town, Castle Hill and the small island of St Catherine's with its' fort

Trecwn

Treffgarne

Trevine

Uzmaston

Velindre-farchog

Walton East

Walton West

Warren

Whitechurch

Wiston

West Williamston

Yerbeston